Hong Kong (again) with Epiq and pending events with iCONECT, Cicayda and kCura

I have just been back to Hong Kong, this time to moderate a panel of litigation lawyers brought together by Thomson Reuters’ Asian Legal Business and by Epiq Systems. Epiq’s Celeste Kemper was in the chair.

Our agenda was cut from under our feet as we began our session by the news of pending developments in the Hong Kong civil procedure rules relating to the management of electronic discovery. The ad hoc agenda which followed was very much more interesting as a result. I will write more about this in due course. I also had lunch with Paul Taylor and Barry Wong of Consilio, as good a way as any of keeping up with what is going on in Hong Kong.

I came back in haste (well, 26 hours from door to door), mainly so as not to miss too much of the family holiday in Cornwall. I write this from a kitchen on a windswept headland from which sea and sky merge in varying shades of grey washed down by copious amounts of rain.

Towards Polzeath

It is good to be back here. Most of our holidays recently have been planned around a foreign conference and, whilst we have seen some wonderful (and generally sunny) places as a result, I have missed the Cornish mist. We are here partly because this is where we have always come (in my wife’s case since the 1950s) and partly because her niece is getting married at St Enodoc, an ancient church recovered from the sand in the mid-19C where John Betjeman is buried.

St Enodoc

I wrote with enthusiasm recently about a series of webinars being given by iCONECT whose first one is called Social Communication: Is There Anything Worth Requesting?   Its theme is the prevalence of new data types created by new kinds of device by new applications and which accumulates around us without really thinking about it. The ease with which we can work from anywhere (a Cornish clifftop, for example) brings enormous benefits, but it brings also the risk that we create data that we do not even know we have got in places unknown to us. That raises all sorts of issues, amongst them the eDiscovery implications.

It was, perhaps, a mistake to write so enthusiastically about this webinar, because the immediate reaction was an email from Ian Campbell at iCONECT inviting me to take part in it. The upshot is that I am speaking in iCONECT’s Webinar at 1.00pm EDT on Wednesday 18 September (that is TODAY) in the company of Ian Campbell and Thomas Barnett of Saito Sorenson LLP. More information, with links to the registration page is here.

I think that I have cracked the comms challenges of operating from here. The next hurdle is to keep the holiday house quiet for the hour’s broadcast – I can hardly turn everyone out into the rain.

Two other unexpected invitations came my way just before I left. One is to take part in a predictive coding panel at kCura’s Relativity Fest in Chicago on 8 October. Having committed to travelling that far, it made sense to volunteer also to look into Cicayda’s interesting RELEvent – the un-conference which takes place in Nashville at the same time. Cicayda’s Roe Frazer promptly put me on a panel for Monday 7 October – about what and with whom I know not, but it sounds fun anyway.

Home

About Chris Dale

I have been an English solicitor since 1980. I run the e-Disclosure Information Project which collects and comments on information about electronic disclosure / eDiscovery and related subjects in the UK, the US, AsiaPac and elsewhere
This entry was posted in Cicayda, Consilio, Discovery, eDisclosure, eDiscovery, Electronic disclosure, Epiq Systems, Hong Kong, KCura, Relativity. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s