Phlogging IQPC with Dominic Regan and ipadio

Let us deconstruct my title in stages, taking the easy bits first. IQPC is a well-known conference organiser whose Information Retention and E-Disclosure Summit is generally recognised as the best of the London conferences on information management and the use of electronic evidence. It takes place this year between 9 and 12 May. I have just recorded a podcast to promote its benefits, which is what the less familiar words in my heading are about.

IQPC’s Day 1 deals broadly with the information management side, kicking off with a session on US and European regulatory investigations and prosecutions with speakers including Vivian Robinson QC, General Counsel to the Serious Fraud Office, whose talk on the Bribery Act at IQPC in Munich alerted me to the crossover between the Bribery Act defence of “adequate procedures”, and broader information management principles. Another star turn is Damon Greer, Director, US-EU and Swiss Safe Harbor Frameworks at the US Department of Commerce. Day 2 brings us, amongst other things, the US-UK Judicial Panel which serves as an annual stimulus to conjoined Anglo-American thought on the court’s role in managing electronic documents.

I am not going to give you a list of the many thought-leaders from companies, law firms and suppliers because it would simply repeat what you can read in the programme. Take it from me that you will not find a better assembly at any other conference, and book your place while you can. I turn up in the programme from time to time, generally in my preferred role as introducer or moderator.

Professor Dominic Regan is a widely sought-after speaker on all aspects of civil litigation, with specific expertise on costs. He is a member of the Civil Justice Council’s Costs Committee and has been asked to oversee the costs pilots which, after a successful trial in Birmingham, are to be rolled out more widely. He is my interviewer of choice when I am asked to speak on e-disclosure.

ipadio is a service which I have only just discovered (and nothing to do with iPads, as you might assume from its name). It allows you to make recordings on to the web and, as its website shows, encourages Phonecasts and Phlogs, whence comes the most obscure of the words in my title (a phlog it is a recorded phone blog, just as a phonecast is a podcast made over the telephone). What is not instantly obvious from the web site is that if two or more people connect to ipadio via a conference call facility, they can record an interview with minimal preparation and make it available as an MP3 almost immediately. The recording may be disseminated by putting it up on a web site or conventional blog.

As with blogs and Twitter, you need to look beyond the introspective ranting and the reflections on what the cat had for breakfast which is what many users will use the service for. The For Business and Applications pages offer ideas which have serious business purposes.

Pulling all these threads together, I was interviewed yesterday by Dominic Regan over ipadio to talk about the IQPC Summit. It wasn’t strictly a phlog (I put that in my title partly to catch your attention and partly because of the homophonic ambiguity – this may not work, of course, when half my readers may be unfamiliar with the use of “flog” to mean “sell”), but simply a convenient way of recording a podcast.

I will point you to the recording when it is published.

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About Chris Dale

I have been an English solicitor since 1980. I run the e-Disclosure Information Project which collects and comments on information about electronic disclosure / eDiscovery and related subjects in the UK, the US, AsiaPac and elsewhere
This entry was posted in eDisclosure, eDiscovery, Electronic disclosure, IQPC. Bookmark the permalink.

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