Twitter as a source of e-discovery information

The best way to get informed about e-disclosure / ediscovery news first thing in the morning is to follow Michelle Mahoney’s overnight tweets (they are at http://twitter.com/michmahon). That is “overnight” in UK terms, since Michelle’s day starts rather earlier than ours – she is Director of Applied Legal Technology at Mallesons Stephen Jacques in Melbourne, which gives  her a head start on the rest of us (or perhaps she does them at night – I’ve rather lost track after a day when I went to bed at 4am).

The last few minutes have brought one of those confusing conjunctions of events which turn up from time to time. As I started dictating this post, I received an e-mail announcing Virtual LegalTech on the 19 November at which Michelle, George Rudoy (Director of Global Practice Technology at Shearman & Sterling), Christopher Byrne (General Counsel at Wave Software) and I are due to talk about international e-discovery. I had barely finished the first sentence, when another e-mail turned up reporting that George Rudoy was following me on Twitter. Since it was George who first suggested that I used Twitter, the timing was apt. I am humbled to see that the few people whom George is following include not only Michelle Mahoney and me but the New York Rangers.

All this hands-across-the-sea stuff is important for more reasons than the personal pleasure one gets from knowing all these nice people. There is a mass of information out there: a lot of it is just marketing material; much of it adds little to one’s understanding or knowledge; there are limits to the number of e-mails one can send out drawing attention to useful or interesting sources of information. George Rudoy’s suggestion that I use Twitter was aimed primarily at notifying people of my own posts, which I now do. Its principal use, however, is the pointers to useful articles which I get from suggestions made by others.

My first story of today, about FTI’s new Paris operation, might have passed me by but for Michelle’s tweet about it. Another of hers points to an article on EDD Update with the heading Cowen Group optimistic about EDD hiring covering a report by Jared Coseglia and David Cowen of the Cowen Group suggesting an upturn in litigation support work, at least judged by staffing requirements.

Both Virtual LegalTech and David Cowen’s research on litigation hiring deserve further comment in due course. My primary object here is to suggest to anyone interested in this market that they follow the ediscovery tweets for an early peek at the news. It does not take long to work out whose suggestions are worth following.

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About Chris Dale

I have been an English solicitor since 1980. I run the e-Disclosure Information Project which collects and comments on information about electronic disclosure / eDiscovery and related subjects in the UK, the US, AsiaPac and elsewhere
This entry was posted in Discovery, eDisclosure, Electronic disclosure, Litigation Support. Bookmark the permalink.

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